5 Effective Ways to Engage High-School Students to Take Part in Robotics Competitions

Can you imagine thousands of middle- and high-school students taking part in robotics competitions based on teamwork? You don’t have to imagine that scenario. Thanks to the Botball Educational Robotics Program, it’s a reality. These kids learn and practice designing, building and programming autonomous robots. It’s a program that makes engineering more fun than ever.
How do you explain that to your students? How do you make this robotics competition attractive enough, so they would spend some of their free time preparing for it?
We’ll suggest 5 effective ways to engage and motivate high-school students to participate in robotics competitions.
1. Teach Some Robotics
The Robotics Academy provides various resources for educators to include robotics in their math, science, engineering, and physics lessons. All students love robots. They will be excited to give life to mechanical devices and see them following instructions, all as a result of their team efforts.
The best thing about including robotics in your lessons is that students find it fun. Asking them to build a robot may sound like a challenging idea at first. However, using Legos and working on a design with your help will make things more approachable.
2. Explain What Robotics Is
“Okay class, let’s build a robot today!” Yeah, that sounds exciting, but it won’t work. If your students have no idea about how robotics works, they will perceive this as yet another burdening assignment they would rather skip. That’s why you have to prepare them for this challenge.
Create a PowerPoint presentation or another type of project to explain the essence of robotics and show how important it is for the development of modern technology. If you don’t have time for that, you can hire essaygeeks.co.uk or another writing service to craft the presentation for you. When you explain how important and fun robotics is, your students will be willing to explore it. From there on, it will be easy for you to get them excited about competitions.
3. Demystify the Complex Technology for Them
All kinds of information about robots is circling in the online world. Some people are concerned about the dangers of this technology, so they only associate robotics to killer robots.
As a teacher, you have to address those fears. You’ll do that by helping your students understand what robots can and can’t do. When they enter competitions, they will engage in the good kind of robotics. They will make efforts to create something useful; something that could make our world a tad better.
4. Get Proper Resources
There are plenty of resources available for parents and teachers who want to engage students in robotics. You can explore Sphero and other simple programmable robots, and proceed with other kinds of robot kits, such as Vex Robotics and Lego Mindstorms. When you and your school are ready to take things further, you can bring sophisticated robots, such as NAO, in the classroom.
Your students have to see and experience how fun robots are. That will get them excited to make their own efforts and start preparing for competitions.
5. Start a Robotics Club
All students should know what robotics is. They will be excited to learn the basics. However, you can’t expect them all to become engineers. Not all of them will want to enter competitions. You cannot force this activity on them.
The easiest way to attract the right students for this training is to start a robotics club. It will engage the students with talent for engineering, and it will provide the needed resources for them to build knowledge and skills. You’ll teach them how teamwork can lead to amazing results. Plus, you’ll prepare them for a competition, where they will act as a team to create great stuff.

Student robotics programs are an important part of the future of education. They are highly effective as a tool for fostering skills like teamwork, collaboration, project management, and problem solving. When you encourage your students to participate in robotics competitions, they will take all those skills to a higher level.

Author Bio:
Chris Richardson is an editor and a blogger from London. He loves to meet new people and talk about modern education and technologies.